Once so sturdy a ladder

Touched by a Guardian Angel

I’ve been touched by a or many Guardian Angels in my lifetime, here on Earth. I’ve looked back and wondered how it is that I could have survived each of these times. Why did I survive each of these times? What is my purpose in life?
Although my stories are quite different and I did not come out of all of them unscathed, I count myself Blessed to have had. My Guardian Angels watching over me…..
  1. When I was a youngster of five or six, I had a heavy fever with a childhood disease that was doing the rounds. Late at night my parents were so concerned they called the doctor who came promptly to see me incoherent. After checking my temperature and asking some questions, I heard him say “…she has a fifty percent chance…” What ever that chance was, I had no idea. I wasn’t lucid enough to understand. However I had a very real over active imagination and I blacked out after thinking – OMG I’m going to die!
    Well, needless to say, I awoke sometime around mid morning and looked up to see the sunlight streaming through the venetian blind. Then I remembered the events of last night and thought – I don’t want to die! I prayed to God to ask him not to take me and then reached out and lifted up my arms above my head. I placed my small  hands on the softest and strongest pair of hands I had felt. I knew these hands to be the hands of God.
    That day, my fever broke and I started eating again for the first time in many days. I knew then, that I would live.
  2. My second brush was a silly one. With a very large, very heavy wooden house ladder. As kids do, they throw balls that land on the roof. They don’t worry, just go get a ladder and climb up to retrieve the ball. All was going well until the ladder was then put together to bring down and take back to the garden shed. Someone had let it fall without calling out first. I happened to be standing under it when it fell, the very top rung landing on my head, bouncing off before landing on the ground. All I felt was a heavy something on my head and saw stars for a few minutes. I was around 9 years young at the time. No ill effects from this event either.
  3. At the age of about fourteen, we were heading southward toward the beautiful Kangaroo Valley. Once we left Sydney the main highway was very hard to see with a full covering of fog lying like a blanket over the road. Even with the head lights on, it was still difficult to see more than twenty yards ahead. However we managed to see the signposts and followed them all the way down. Then came one that turned us to the right and down a narrow and winding road. Fortunately the fog was lifting slightly by this time. It was about mid morning. Then an abrupt stop. Across the road lay a very large, very heavy tree. Its branches reached out to the other side and beyond. My father stopped the car, we got out and surveyed the situation. Mnnn…couldn’t turn around and go back – no where to safely turn around. Only two ways out. One to reverse back, and this was not safe, or to try driving around the smaller branches at the far right of the side of the road and travel down to the bottom of the mountain. My father, being the ever optimist, decided on the latter. So we got back into the car and he attempted to drive slowly, inching around the fallen branches. Unbeknown to my mother and I, there was a very deep drop on the right side of the road. As we were about half way around, a tree branch decided it would be nice to say g’day and breached the side window, shattering glass all over her lap. Her scream must have been heard from the bottom of the canyon. For me, sitting alongside both parents, squarely in the middle, her scream was blood curdling. My father kept his foot on the pedal, regardless and continued to inch around the tree branches until he had arrived safely on the other side. Stopping the car, my mother was, by this time, weeping steadily and uncontrollably next to me. We got out of the car and surveyed the situation once more, looking over the edge to see the magnitude of the drop whereby my mother all but fainted. Still, we lived to arrive to out destination and enjoy the rest of the day.
  4. The next events all involved cars. This one was a hiace van, caravan and a mountain. (No, not the same as above). Travelling southward toward Melbourne along the beautiful Maroondah highway we were enjoying the scenery as well as the fresh air. We had just passed the tiny township of Narbethong when a loud whistling sound emitted from under the van. I turned to Greg to ask “What’s going…..on” suddenly there was a loud thump and he swerved the can into a ditch on the left side of the road. The van and caravan had jackknifed so we had come to a very abrupt halt. Although the road was windy and narrow, there was room for two lanes, so one of us had to guide the traffic around our vehicles. Greg walked down the road a little further to survey our situation and see if there was any traffic coming northbound to take one of us back to the last town for help. When he came back he reported a sheer drop over the edge, that he doubted we would have survived if it had happened only twenty metres south! I already had gone as white as a ghost, now I felt like my mother had all those years ago.  Well, I am happy to say that there were so many guardian angels on this journey that it was overwhelming. Again, we got through this event, had our van and caravan repaired (they just needed some minor, though time consuming repairs done) and we arrived safely at our destination. Thence back to Sydney once more.
  5. This next one of these was on our way from home to Echuca. We began our journey on Australia Day 1989. Stopping at Goulburn for breakfast, our next stop would be closer to the NSW/Victorian border. However, the fates had a different plan in mind for us that day. We were approaching the north westerly direction of Yass. I was dropping off to sleep with a fully belly under my belt. Suddenly there was a loud, very loud whistling coming from under the hiace van. I looked across to Greg and asked the silly question, “what’s going…on…” to which he replied “a blowout”. He appeared to be wrestling with the steering wheel for a while, then came the strong stench of burning rubber and the next thing I know we are rolling on the road. All I could do was stare at the dashboard as the sound of metal crunching reminded me of some of the rides at Luna Park. For a few moments, I had this feeling that I was on some kind of wild and woolley ride. The van came to rest upside down and we were hanging from our seats, still held in by our firm seatbelts. Fearing a fire, we unbuckled immediately and scrambled out the driver’s side window, the only way we could both get out with the passenger side having caved in.
    Once out, we were able to survey it a little more, although I had blood running down my face and could not find my eye glasses. Fortunately for both of us, there were many people able who came to our rescue to help us, including local Police and Ambulance officers.
    When I walked to the wreckers later that day from the motel, I saw with shock and surprise that the metal tracking from the side door of the van had come out and gone straight into the back of the head rest – MY head rest! Had that head rest been hollow, I would most certainly not be here today. The roof of the van had also caved in so that there was a noticeable “V” reaching to the top of the dashboard on MY side of the van. Again, missing me by inches. This alone, caused me to say aloud – “Therefore the Grace of God, go I…”
  6. Going on holidays is a tricky business in our family. It always has been, and most likely, always will be fraught with accidents waiting to happen. Mostly car accidents. They are none the less, most inopportune and all unforeseen!
    So this one to Bingara was no exception. We were late leaving home due to hiccups from our shop security system happening at Christmas time (when else do these hiccups occur?). We arrived at Bingara, our usual country holiday destination to get away from it all after another stop on the main expressway just before the Mooney Mooney Bridge with a flat tyre on the caravan. Then at the caravan park, erecting the annexe to the van for the very first time, it bucketed down and poured a month of rain down in a few hours. (You would think we would have taken the hints, but we both felt we were due this holiday – no matter what!)
    Things continued to happen to us every day of this “holiday from hell”. You know, the usual stuff – flat tyres, being bogged in sand at night time at the Copeton Dam and having to walk miles to the ranger’s hut for help…driving home and narrowly missing a really large bull in the middle of the road after coming around the corner back to the caravan park later at night. Driving on an old road to Narrabri down a windy narrow road and getting lost. Finally we thought we were onto a winner when the dust seemed to have settled and we were enjoying a lovely drive in the country. Then the warning came again – a loud whistling noise, the van careering off the road from the soft dirt at a soft corner, Greg was trying to keep the near empty van upright, so put his foot on the pedal. The next thing I know we went through a barbed wire fence and were driving speedily (so I thought) toward a tall, large Fig tree in the middle of someone’s property. As we came closer, i saw a vision of me and the tree meeting in some afterlife. I gathered my wits and my dog, Heidi who was sitting next to me in the middle of the front seat, and prepared to meet my maker. Well, the van came to an abrupt halt metres from the tree and I breathed again! With a loud sigh of relief, I let go of Heidi and looked around. No one was within cooee, this bright cheery Sunday morning.
    Again, we made it back to Bingara and stayed for another few days with small hiccups along the way. It was really good to be getting home (Would you believe, without incident?)
FollowFollow on FacebookFollow on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on Pinterest

Leave a Reply

Scroll to top
Supporter of Content Protector Fantastic Plugins